PARAGUAYAN WILDLIFE HOME
REPTILES HOME
FAMILY EMBALLONURIDAE
    Different species of this family can vary significantly in size from 5 to 105 grams.  In this family, the bones which hold the incisors (premaxillary bones) do not fuse with each other or with the maxillary bones.  Although the metacarpal of the second finger is present, there are no phalanges.  The ears are often fused together across the head.  Members of this family roost in groups ranging in size from 3 to 30, although some may be solitary.    Insects compose the majority of their diet although fruit may also be included.  This family of bats retains the greatest number of primitive ancestral conditions among the microchiropteran bats (Nowack, 1994; Anderson, 1967).
bat bat skull
FAMILY NOCTILIONIDAE

     This family of bats lacks postorbital processes.  The premaxillary bones are fused to each other and the maxillary bones.  The second finger possesses a rudimentary phalanx.  Members of the single genus this family feed on insects or fish (and, as such, represent one of only three bat genera which can feed on fish).  Although most feed at night, some have been observed feeding on fish during the day with pelicans.  If forced to, they can swim with their wings under water. 

bat skull bat skull
bat bat

FAMILY VESPERTILIONIDAE

    In this family of bats, the nose is simple compared to the modified structures of other families.  They have short tails and possess membranes (interfemoral membranes) which connect the legs and tail.  The largest group in this family is the genus Myotis, composed of small bats which possess a pointed projection (tragus) in their ear.  Most species eat insects (many of which are caught close to water) although a few feed on fish. 

bat bat

bat skull

bat skull

bat skull

bat skull

bat skull

bat skull
bat bat skull
bat ears bat