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FAMILY COLUBRIDAE 

 

     More than three quarters of all snake species are members of the family Colubridae.  Colubrid snakes are characterized by the absence of any trace of a pelvic girdle, the lack of a coronoid bone in the lower jaw, and the lack of a functional left lung.  Colubrids possess teeth in both jaws but lack fangs.  Some species possess grooved teeth associated with a poison gland.  Of these, only the boomslang and bird snakes (neither of which occur in the U.S.) are dangerous to humans.  Colubrids have adapted to a wide variety of habitats and lifestyles, and include arboreal, burrowing, and aquatic species.  While most lay eggs, females of many species can bear live young.  They are the most commonly found snakes in most parts of the world, except Australia.  There is some concern that this large family has grouped together snakes which are not closely related and that a better taxonomic scheme would separate this large family into several distinct families (Behler, 1989; Mattison, 1995).

GREEN SNAKEGREEN SNAKE

SNAKESNAKE

Apostolepis ambiniger

Apostolepis ambiniger

Atractus reticulate

Atractus reticulate

Bojruna maculate

Bojruna maculate

Chironius flavolineatus

Chironius flavolineatus

Chronius quadricarinatus

Chronius quadricarinatus

Clelia bicolor

Clelia bicolor

Clelia clelia

Clelia clelia

Clelia plumbea

Clelia plumbea

Clelia quimi

Clelia quimi

Clelia rustica

Clelia rustica

Drymorchon corais

Drymorchon corais

Elaphe obsoluta

Elaphe obsoluta

Elapomorphus spegazzinii

Elapomorphus spegazzinii

Erythrolamprus aesculapii

Erythrolamprus aesculapii

Helicops infrataeniatus

Helicops infrataeniatus

Helicops leopardinus

Helicops leopardinus

Hydrodynastes gigas

Hydrodynastes gigas

Hysops triangularis

Hysops triangularis

Imantodes canchoa

Imantodes canchoa

Leptodeira annulata

Leptodeira annulata