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PRIMITIVE SNAKES

FAMILY ANOMALEPIDIDAE

     The snakes of the family Anomalepidae are limited to South America and Central America.  These snakes are closely related to blind snakes and are among the most primitive snakes.  They burrow underground where they feed on termites and other invertebrates (Mattison, 1995).

Liotyphlophis berii

Liotyphlophis berii

Liotyphlophis ternetzii

Liotyphlophis ternetzii

FAMILY TYPHLOPIDAE

BLIND SNAKES

Blind snakes inhabit the southern regions of the world.  They are small, burrowing snakes with scales covering their small eyes.  They feed primarily on ants and termites.  Their tails are short, they possess a pelvic girdle, the left lung is reduced or absent, there is only one oviduct (Mattison, 1995).

Typhlops brongarsmianus

Typhlops brongarsmianus

 

FAMILY LEPTOTYPHLOPIDAE

THREAD SNAKES

This family of snakes is found throughout Latinamerica, Africa and the Middle East.  These small snakes retain pelvic girdles and spur-like vestigial legs.    They are burrowing snakes which feed on termites.  They lack a left lung, a left oviduct, and scales cover their small eyes (Mattison, 1995).

Leptotyphlops australis

Leptotyphlops australis

Leptotyphlops melanotermus

Leptotyphlops melanotermus

Leptotyphlops munoai

Leptotyphlops munoai

Leptotyphlops anguirostris

Leptotyphlops anguirostris

FAMILY BOIDAE

BOAS AND PYTHONS

    There are 8 genera of boas, some of which possess labial pits which can sensitive to heat.

Boa constrictor

Boa constrictor

Boa constrictor
Epicrates cenchaia

Epicrates cenchaia

Eunectes

There are at least two species of anaconda.  Eunectes murinus can reach lengths of at least 9 meters, longer than any other snake.  It usually is found near water where it can feed on a variety of animals including immature caimans.

Eunectes murinus

Eunectes murinus

Eunectes notaeus