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PEREGRINNE FALCON

Peregrinne falcons feed primarily on birds which are killed in flight although they can also feed on insects and mammals. They can nest on cliff faces and tall buildings. Males can perform a stoop in which they dive at 185 mph (285 kph).
Peregrinne falcons were extinct in the eastern half of the U.S. after the mid-1960s due to the use of pesticides. They were once one of the most widespread raptors in the world. Because of their position at the top of food chains, they are especially vulnerable to pesticide use. While there were an estimated 200 breeding sites in the 1940s east of the Mississippi, by the 1960s there was not a single peregrine falcon east of the Mississippi river. By the 1990s almost 100 pairs were known in eastern states, including more than 20 pairs in New York. Because they prefer to nest near cliff-like structures, they have adapted to urban settings with their tall buildings. Unfortunately, this often exposes the peregrines to chemical pollution. For several years, the chicks hatched in nests around Philadelphia were removed to be raised elsewhere because of the low survival rates of chicks raised in that region (Weidensaul, 1996).

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peregrinne PEREGRINNE FALCON

PEREGRINNE FALCON

 
   
PEREGRINNE FALCON PEREGRINNE FALCON