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PILEATED WOODPECKER

Pileated woodpeckers form a superspecies with the lineaged and black bodied woodpeckers with which they can hybridize. After the imperial woodpeckers (which are almost certainly extinct) and ivory billed woodpeckers (which are near extinction), the pileated woodpeckers are the largest woodpeckers in North America. They are the seventh largest woodpecker in the world, measuring up to 48 cm long and weighing 290-341 grams.

They can feed on carpenter ants, wood-boring insects, termites, fruits, and berries. Once, 2600 ants were found in the stomach of a pileated woodpecker. Pileated woodpeckers mate for life.

Their preferred habitat is that of tall, mature forests and their nests can be located up to 12 meters high in a tree. As a result, deforestation is causing their decline and they have been protected by law since the early 1900s. Nest holes are rectangular, measuring about 4.5 inches in height and 3.5 inches across. Thirty-eight vertebrate species are known to utilize used pileated holes (Backhouse, 2005; Winkler 1995; Short, 1982).

PILEATED WOODPECKER PILEATED WOODPECKER
PILEATED WOODPECKER PILEATED WOODPECKER
PILEATED WOODPECKER

PILEATED WOODPECKER

PILEATED WOODPECKER

PILEATED WOODPECKER  
     Red-headed woodpeckers can have 2 broods per year.  Their diet is primarily composed of insects and nuts but it can even include eggs, nestlings, mice, and corn in their diet.  They feed on acorns and beechnuts when they are available and can even store acorns and insects.  One third of its diet is composed of animal material; two thirds of it is composed of plant material.  They can catch some insects in flight.  Red headed woodpeckers migrate long distances, unlike most woodpeckers.